Mathematics decks

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by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This set of facts includes all the turn‐around facts for the twos facts. Students should use their knowledge of multiplication and fact families to solve these facts.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
These facts all have at least one addend of 8 or 9. One strategy for these facts it to build onto the 8 or 9 and up to 10 and then add on the rest. For 6 + 8, start with 8, then 2 more makes 1-, and that leaves 4 more for 14.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This set of facts includes all the turn-around facts for facts of zero. Students should use their knowledge of zero to help them determine the difference of each fact.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This set of facts includes all of the addition and subtraction facts.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
Thirty‐six facts have at least one factor that is either 0 or 1. These facts, though apparently easy, tend to get confused with “rules” that some children learned for addition. Above all else, avoid rules that sound arbitrary and without reason such as “Any number multiplied by zero is zero”.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This group consists of all facts with 5 as the first or second factor. Fives facts are learned can be learned quickly because students have been counting by fives since grade 1.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This level includes a review of all facts plus 6 facts that have not been covered by any strategies.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
Facts with a factor of 9 include the largest products but can be among the easiest to learn.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This set of facts includes all the turn-around facts for the doubles. Students should use their knowledge of addition and fact families to solve these facts. For example, when solving 8 - 4, the student should ask, “What plus 4 equals 8?”.
by Tim Bottman on Mar 11, 2014
This set of facts includes all the turn-around facts for the inside doubles. Students should use their knowledge of addition and fact families to solve these facts. For example, when solving 8 - 5, the student should ask, “What plus 5 equals 8?”.